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Scallop & Spring Onion Gyoza with Pickled Brassicas from Too Good to Waste

Too Good to Waste by Victoria Glass is THE guide to getting the very most out of your food, in the most delicious way possible! So much good food is thrown away when actually, with a bit of creative thinking, you can eat up everything – and enjoy a much more exciting meal for it.  This book is about rethinking what we throw away, and why. By taking this waste-free approach, these recipes are some of the most inventive and innovative that you will ever try, and can show you a whole new way to think about your meals. Start your food waste journey with this delicious recipe!

From Victoria: ‘This is a great way of eating scallops without blowing your budget. The wrappers can be kept chilled for up to 4 days, or frozen for up to 3 months. You can open freeze raw, filled dumplings; just defrost before cooking. Shop-bought wrappers and a gyoza press will turn this labour of love into a speedy supper.’

Taken from Too Good to Waste by Victoria Glass

Serves 6-8

Ingredients

For the pickled brassica stems
a thumb of root ginger, peeled and cut into fine matchsticks
3 spring onions/scallions, cut into fine matchsticks
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tbsp sunflower oil
1 tbsp sesame oil
1½ tbsp mirin
2 tbsp tamari
2 tsp dark soft brown sugar
base of 2 cauliflower or broccoli heads, cut into matchsticks
For the gyoza wrappers
200g/7oz/1½ cups plain/all-purpose flour
⅓ tsp fine sea salt
cornflour/cornstarch, for dusting
For the seafood filling
8 large scallops, finely chopped
8 spring onions/scallions, chopped
3–4 garlic cloves, crushed
a thumb of root ginger, peeled and finely chopped or grated
1 long red chilli, with seeds if you like it hot, finely chopped
2 tbsp tamari soy sauce
2 tbsp sesame oil
2 tsp sugar
1 tbsp sunflower oil
Ponzu Dipping Sauce, to serve

Method
Put all the pickling-liquid ingredients into a large plastic box and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Toss with the brassica stems, cover and chill, shaking the box every now and then. They will last for up to a week.
Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Slowly mix in 100ml/3½fl oz/scant ½ cup boiling water to form a dough, stirring with a chopstick. Dust with cornflour/cornstarch and knead for 10 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Cut in half and roll into two 4cm/1½in thick sausage shapes. Wrap in cling film/plastic wrap and rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
Unwrap both sausages, dust with cornflour/cornstarch and cut each one into 15 pieces. Cover with a damp cloth. One at a time, shape into a ball, then flatten and roll out to a circle about 3mm/⅛in thick. Use an 8cm/3¼in round cutter to make a perfect circle, if you wish. Keep dusting with cornflour/cornstarch to prevent sticking and cover all the pastry with a damp cloth to stop it from drying out.
Mix the filling ingredients, then leave to stand for 10 minutes. Put a scant teaspoon of filling in the middle of a wrapper. Wet the edges and fold the wrapper over the filling, pleating the edges to seal and expelling the air. Heat the sunflower oil in a wide, heavy-based pan. Fry half the gyoza at a time for a few minutes, or until the bottoms are brown and crisp. Add 3 tablespoons water, cover and steam for 2 minutes. Serve with the pickled brassica stalks and the ponzu dipping sauce.

Go forth, cook and devour! Don’t forget to tag us (@NourishBooks) in your social pics!

Cinnamon and Hazelnut Knots from Slow Dough: Real Bread

Today we’re sharing a much coveted Real Bread: Slow Dough recipe – Cinnamon and Hazelnut Knots! These sweet knots are beloved all over Scandinavia, whip up a batch of 8 using Chris Young’s recipe.

From Chris:
‘Back in early 2010, I spent two nights at Fifteen, the enterprise set up by Jamie Oliver to help train young people who have the passion to work in a high-end restaurant but who have struggled to hold down, or even find, a job. I was there to see what other bakeries could learn about taking on apprentices, and these buns are inspired by a loaf their baker Kenny Rankin showed me how to make, as well as by the spiced, enriched buns found across Scandinavia.’

Taken from Slow Dough: Real Bread

 

Makes: 8 buns
From Mixing to Oven: 4½–6½ hours
Baking Time: 15–20 minutes

Ingredients
Dough:
250g/9oz/1¾ cups white bread flour
100g/3½oz/¾ cup plain/all-purpose flour
140g/5oz/generous 1⁄2 cup buttermilk
40g/1½oz/¼ cup caster/superfine sugar
30g/1oz/2 tbsp butter
10g/2 tsp fresh yeast
1 egg
5g/1 tsp fine/table salt
Filling:
100g/3½oz/1¾ cups fresh white breadcrumbs, very fine
100g/3½oz/heaping ½ cup caster/superfine sugar
100g/3½oz/⅔ cup ground hazelnuts
4g/1½ tsp ground cinnamon
75g/2½oz/scant ½ cup water
icing/confectioners’ sugar, for glazing

Method
1 Mix all of the dough ingredients together thoroughly, then knead until you have a smooth, silky, stretchy dough. Cover and leave at room temperature for 3–5 hours until well risen.
2 Meanwhile, mix the filling ingredients together, adding the water a little at a time until you have a spreadable paste (you may not need it all). Cover and leave in the refrigerator until needed. Line a baking sheet with non-stick baking parchment.
3 Roll the dough out on a lightly floured work surface into a 40x20cm/16x8in rectangle, with the long edges to the sides and a short edge facing you. Spread the filling over the half of the dough nearest to you, then fold the remaining dough towards you to cover this.
4 Cut the dough lengthways into 8 strips, stretching them out to 25–30cm/10–12in long. Take a strip and, holding one end in each hand, twist it to create a rope effect (see below, fig. 1). Holding one end firmly between thumb and forefinger, wrap the rest of the strip around twice (fig. 2), finishing by tucking the end of the strip into the middle of the spiral you have just created (fig. 3). Place on the lined baking sheet and repeat with the remaining strips of dough. Cover and leave to rise for 1 hour.
5 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/400°F/gas 6. Bake the knots for 10 minutes, then turn the oven down to 180°C/160°C fan/350°F/ gas 4 and continue to bake for a further 5–10 minutes until golden brown. Leave to cool on a wire rack for 5–10 minutes, glazing the knots while still warm by brushing with water and dusting with icing/confectioners’ sugar through a small sieve/strainer

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