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Meet Renee McGregor, our Guest Instagrammer!

Renee McGregor is one of the UK’s top sports nutritionists, advising athletes from amateur to Olympic levels. With years of experience and expertise in sports nutrition, she offers vital and unequalled insight into what you need to fuel your success in your given sport.
This week we publish her new books: Fast Fuel: Food for Triathlon Success and Fast Fuel: Food for Running Success.

Take a look at our Instagram account, Renee will be our guest Instagrammer from Tuesday until Friday this week.

 

https://soundcloud.com/watkins-media/training-food

Towards the Olympic Games: Renee McGregor and Aly Dixon

The term ‘training’ can mean so many things. For some of you it will be about increasing your stamina over an increasing distance; for others it will be about increasing your speed. You might train using a combination of speed, core, strength and endurance sessions or you might use only one or perhaps two of those techniques. Some of you will go with active rest days, while others might take whole days off altogether. Whether your sport is running, cycling, swimming or team-based, you probably know that training is fundamental to your performance.

Training Food author Renee McGregor interviews Rio 2016 Olympics qualifier Aly Dixon. Aly is a long-distance runner, the fastest British woman to finish the 2016 London Marathon, assuring her place in Rio 2016.

Renee McGregor is one of the UK’s top sports nutritionists, advising athletes from amateur to Olympic levels. With years of experience and expertise in sports nutrition, she offers vital and unequalled insight into what you need to fuel your success in your given sport.

Alyson Dixon is an English long-distance-runner who has competed in several marathons and half marathons and won the 2011 Brighton Marathon. She competed for England at the 2014 Commonwealth Games, but did not finish due to a calf injury. This year she qualified for the Rio 2016 Olympics. For more information, you can visit her website.

 

Towards the Paralympic games: Renee McGregor and Piers Gilliver

You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get. – Michael Phelps

Training Food author Renee McGregor interviews Rio 2016 Paralympics qualifier Piers Gilliver. Piers is Britain’s number one wheelchair fencer and he qualified for the 2016 Rio Paralympics.

Renee McGregor is one of the UK’s top sports nutritionists, advising athletes from amateur to Olympic levels. With years of experience and expertise in sports nutrition, she offers vital and unequalled insight into what you need to fuel your success in your given sport.

Podcast/ Conversation with Renee McGregor

Steve Nobel interviews Renee McGregor, author of Training Food.
Follow Watkins Media on SoundCloud and listen to the latest interviews and talks.

Renee McGregor Bsc(hons) RD PGCERT(sportsnutr) is a registered dietitian and is one of the UK’s top sports nutritionists who has over 14 years experience advising athletes and their coaches at all levels.
Renee is a regular contributor to BBC Food, Cycling Plus, Trail Running Magazine, Runner’s world Magazines and she is the author of Training Food.
This book is written to help you understand the science of sports nutrition through practical advice and is packed with over 100 delicious and easy to make recipes to enhance your physical performance.

On this podcast:
Nutrition requirements for different types of sport.
Organic versus processed food during training.
Micronutrients and supplements during training.
Vegetarian versus meat eating during training.
Combining of carbs, protein, and fats.
Getting the right kind of hydration for our chosen sport.

9781848992696-300x462

Renee McGregor
Training Food
£10.99
Available from Nourish Books

 

 

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Meet Renee McGregor

Renee McGregor Bsc(hons)RD PGCERT(sportsnutr) is a registered dietitian and sports nutritionist. Accreditedimage by the Health professions Council and a member of SDUK – Sports Dietitians UK, Renee has over 10 years expertise and knowledge in nutrition, including experience working with elite athletes and their coaches; she is a regular contributor to BBC Food, Cycling Plus, Trail Running Magazine, Runner’s world Magazines. Renee has now just finished her first book – Training Food, which every athlete needs to fuel their training!

Can you describe your book? What should the reader expect from it?
The book is a journey really – a complete guide to sports nutrition. The first section takes you through the science and importance of sports nutrition; how your body works and how you feed it appropriately, looking at individual components of the diet as well as de bunking myths around fad diets and tackling the subject of sports supplements.
The middle section of the book looks at individual sports but also the types of training you might do within these sports and how you tailor your nutrition accordingly. There are meal plan, practical tips and case studies.
The next section highlights the importance of getting the balance right between nutrition and training and how to spot potential problems and risks of injury.
The final section includes the recipes ranging from breakfasts to desserts. All the recipes are quick and easy to follow with no special ingredients and suitable for the whole family.

What sport do you practice?
My main sports is running, generally trail running from half marathon distance all the way up to ultra-marathon distance. The longest distance I have covered to date is 50 miles around the Gower Peninsula along the coastal path. I also do a lot of yoga.

What are your goals and intentions as a writer?
My main goals and intentions are to write informatively, making science simple and accessible to all. I am passionate about ensuring everything is evidence based, even if that sometimes means its not what individuals want to hear!

You work as a nutritionist. What are the biggest challenges in your job?
My job is very diverse which I love; within the same day I could be working with junior athletes all the way to athletes on the elite pathway. The main aim of my role is to ensure that each athlete regardless of their background meets there performance goals. For some this will be about getting stronger; for others it will be getting faster or returning from illness and injury.
My main challenge are the constant messages in the media which often don’t have any real evidence behind them and are usually being presented by individuals who are not qualified to give out nutritional information.

What is the ingredient that is absolutely necessary in training food?
Probably Greek yoghurt!

Do you have a favourite recipe?
I have 2 – the Blueberry birchers muesli and the 3 lentil dhal with coriander and chilli. But it seems that the most popular recipe by far are The Sweet potato Brownies!

What is your next project?
I’m not sure t the moment – there are a few options; I have been considering going back to study more but I’m also still really enjoying working with athletes especially in the lead up to Rio. I wouldn’t be opposed to writing more books either!

training-foodRenee McGregor
Training Food
ISBN: 9781848992665
£10.99

 

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Fact or Fiction on Caffeine

feat image caffeine

– by Renee Mcgregor

Some people can’t even think about stringing a sentence together before they have had their first shot of caffeine, while others will be reduced to a nervous wreck simply from inhaling coffee fumes.
So what is the deal with caffeine?
For years we were told to be wary of how many caffeinated drinks we consumed daily as they had diuretic properties, resulting in dehydration.
As science evolves, messages change and the truth is that a moderate consumption – 1–3 strong cups of coffee a day, 3–6 cups of tea or a can of coke – will have no negative effect on your health.
When it comes to sports nutrition, caffeine has its own part to play. It has been used by many elite athletes as a performance- enhancing substance, but as with everything, what works for one person doesn’t necessarily work for another.
Individuals are either caffeine responders or non-responders. If you are someone who can drink a cup of coffee late at night and still sleep like a baby, you are a non-responder. In other words, caffeine has no effect on you at all. If, however, the opposite is true and you will be up all night, tossing and turning, you are responder. Caffeine works best as a performance enhancer in those who are responders and the suggested dose is 1–3mg/kg bW about an hour before training/competing.
If you find that you respond strongly, I would suggest sticking to the lower limit of this value and definitely practise drinking this amount in training.
For non-responders there is some evidence to suggest that cutting caffeine out completely for 10 days and then re-introducing it before a competition can have more enhanced effects.
That said, you have to weigh up if the withdrawal symptoms are worth it or not!
My advice to athletes is that if you habitually drink caffeine then it is best not to change anything immediately before a competition.

 

training-food

 

Renee McGregor
Training Food
ISBN: 9781848992665
£10.99

 

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