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Impress your family and friends with this delicious breakfast or brunch dishes. These recipes are easy to make at home or at work, and they are reach of healthy ingredients to energize your day. You can get more breakfast ideas reading Jo Pratt’s In the Mood for Healthy Food.

Poached eggs, tahini and pan-fried avocado

Once toasted, the crunch you get from the bread works really well with the soft egg and avocado. As for the tahini – it really tops off the dish. This protein-rich paste made from ground sesame seeds gives some real oomph. If you’ve not already tried pan-frying avocado, then you must give this recipe a go. It has a smoky taste, similar to that of mild smoked bacon, so it’s perfect with eggs for a late breakfast or brunch.

In the mood for healthy food Jo Pratt

Serves: 4 (or 2 very hungry people)
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
4 eggs
2 tbsp olive or coconut oil
2 ripe avocados, peeled, pitted and cut into 1cm/½in thick slices
4 thick slices of fresh bread (such as sourdough or rye bread)
3 tbsp tahini, plus extra to serve
1 tsp sumac
1 tsp toasted sesame seeds
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Method:

  • Bring a medium to large pan of water to the boil over a medium-high heat and add the white wine vinegar.
  • Break in the eggs one at a time and reduce the heat to a gentle simmer.
  • Cook for 2–3 minutes until the whites are set.
  • Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large frying pan. Add the avocado slices and fry for about 1–2 minutes on each side until slightly golden. Remove from the heat and season with salt and pepper.
  • Toast the bread until golden. Spread each slice with tahini, then top with the avocado slices. Remove the poached eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon.
  • Dry any excess water with paper towels and then put the eggs on top of the toasts.
  • Season with salt and pepper. Scatter with the sumac and sesame seeds, then serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a little more tahini.

Turmeric and coriander omelettes with chilli tomatoes

This is certainly a breakfast or brunch dish that’s not lacking in flavour or colour, and is guaranteed to impress whoever you make it for. Turmeric gives the omelette a vibrant yellow colour and a mellow spiced flavour, and is said to have powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that could potentially ward off some pretty horrible things.

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Serves:  2
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:
6 eggs
1 tsp ground turmeric
2 tbsp chopped coriander/cilantro leaves
4 tsp olive oil
For the chilli tomatoes:
4 tsp olive oil
200g/7oz/1½ cups cherry tomatoes, halved
2 garlic cloves, crushed
a pinch of dried chilli/hot pepper flakes
1 tsp nigella seeds
2 large handfuls of spinach leaves, roughly chopped
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method:

  • To make the chilli tomatoes, heat a frying pan over a medium heat and add the oil.
  • When hot, add the tomatoes and garlic. Fry for a couple of minutes until the tomatoes start to soften, then stir in the dried chilli/hot pepper flakes and nigella seeds and season with salt and pepper.
  • Continue to cook for 2–3 minutes until the tomatoes are squishy. Finally, stir in the spinach until it’s wilted, then keep warm while you make the omelettes.
  • Beat the eggs in a bowl, add the turmeric and coriander/cilantro, and season with salt and pepper.
  • Heat a small non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add half the oil and swirl around to coat the base and sides of the pan.
  • Pour half of the egg mixture into the pan. Move around in the pan with the base of a fork (taking care not to scratch your pan) until you have a soft scrambled consistency.
  • Now leave the omelette to finish cooking so the egg is just set – this should only take a minute or so. Keep warm while you make the second omelette with the remaining egg mixture.
  • Transfer the omelettes to plates. Spoon half of the chilli tomatoes and spinach onto one side of each omelette.

 

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Jo Pratt
In the Mood for Healthy Food
£ 20.00, available from Nourish Books

 

PeaSoupEats is a blog started by Aine Carlin in 2010. Aine recently moved back to Cornwall after living in London via Chicago for the past 14 years. PeaSoupEats is a lifestyle blog, where Aine documents what she eats, wears and generally love. Follow her blog , youtube channel, twitter and instagram @AineCarlin. Aine Carlin is the author of  Keep it Vegan and The New Vegan (release date 31st Dec. 2015), published by Kyle Books and available to buy on Amazon and all good bookstores.

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Photography @ Ali Allen

How did PeaSoupEats start and what inspired you to write a blog?
I started PeaSoupEats back in 2010 when food blogging was kind of in its infancy. In all honesty, I wasn’t aware of blogs at the time (in fact, I rarely used the internet) and it was actually my husband’s suggestion to start one, as a way of collating my favourite recipes. It went from there really and eventually became an online diary of sorts (I have the habit of oversharing), where I chronicled my journey into veganism through eating. The blog seems to have grown quite organically and I’ve chosen to keep it ad-free, so I don’t have to make any compromises on content – in that respect, it’s still incredibly personal and a real labour of love.

How would you describe your blog to our readers?
It’s a very honest space where I share simple recipes with a plant-based twist. I focus entirely on the food and never really talk about the ins and outs of veganism, as I’ve always wanted it to be a positive, inclusive place that people can come to and discover vegan food without having to wade through heavy duty posts. Most of the people who read my blog or have bought my book (Keep it Vegan) aren’t even vegan themselves, and I love that – it means they feel comfortable hanging out in my world for a while without feeling judged, which is a huge compliment. I get so many messages from parents who’ve previously struggled to feed their newly vegan teenagers and even grown men trying to alter their lifestyle, all of whom have responded to my straightforward approach to plant-based cooking. I’m not all about ‘healthy’ eating either and like to think I’ve managed to strike a balance between food that feeds the soul and is also a joy to eat – expect kale alongside sugar … although never in the same dish, I hasten to add.

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Photography @ Ali Allen

Can you tell us about your lifestyle?
My lifestyle is pretty ‘normal’ albeit very food centric … I’m always thinking about recipes, flavour combinations and what I’m going to eat next. I live in deepest Cornwall so the pull of the outdoors is always there – we like nothing more than taking long, coastal walks or even casual strolls around our beautiful little village of Mousehole. I fall in and out of love with yoga but mostly my exercise routine involves a pair of wellies and a delightful trudge in the country. Other than that, I write and create recipes, work on my blog, (limited) photography skills, youtube channel and, in wonderfully fifties fashion, ‘keep a nice house’ … I adore interiors and have tried to cultivate a bit of quiet sanctuary for us both. Thanks to my books, every week brings new challenges and I’m always happy to travel for work so my schedule can be a bit helter skelter at times, which is a nice contrast to our simple Cornish lifestyle.

What is your take on organic food?
I try to buy organic as often as possible and tend to apply the ‘clean 15/dirty dozen’ rule when shopping … so spinach, apples and tomatoes are always organic but I might be a more lax on other things, such as pineapple, avocado and onions. With that said, I think the information surrounding organic produce can be exhausting and confusing, and it needs to be made clearer that it’s not simply about taste. I’m equally concerned about the health of our soil (and planet) than I am about our collective personal health. Obviously regularly ingesting food that’s been doused in pesticides can never be good but thankfully things do seem to be improving. Accessibility is key, as is price, so it’s about trying to make those things successfully work in tandem. It’s also a case of supply and demand, therefore the more we support the organic market, the more likely suppliers will be to make the necessary changes.

What is a successful recipe you mastered?
Hmmm, that’s a hard one but it’s probably my ‘Buttermilk’ pancakes … I used to think pancakes minus the egg, and indeed buttermilk, inclusion would be a catastrophe but my plant-based ‘Buttermilk Pancake’ recipe from Keep it Vegan is one of my most popular dishes – even non-vegans use it as their go-to recipe. They are light, fluffy and foolproof – weekends just aren’t the same without a batch of these on the go, I highly recommend them!

Can you tell us your top 3 food websites that inspired you the most?
Joy the Baker was one of the first food blogs I ever read and it’s still one of the best – for me, a successful blog doesn’t just lie in the recipes or images (although they are important) but also in the voice of its creator and Joy is still one of the wittiest, most ‘down-to-earth’ bloggers out there.

Oh Dear Drea is an authentic little blog with a subtle vegan angle. Being a bit of a voyeur I’ve really enjoyed watching this blogger blossom and can’t wait for her new cookbook ‘The Plantiful Table’ … not only does Andrea have great style but her recipes are always really easy and appealing.

Nigella taught me to cook (well, not literally), so I couldn’t not mention her fantastic website, which is like a fabulous mashup of all her all-time greats, as well as a bit of her always welcome ‘witter’. Some people think it’s strange that I worship at the altar of Ms Lawson (what with me being vegan and all) but I honestly have no qualms about admitting to my ongoing obsession.